What We Think

 

What We Think is the third school climate survey conducted by the National School Boards Association’s Council of Urban Boards of Education. It follows last year’s Where We Teach, which surveyed 4,700 teachers and administrators to solicit their perspectives on the urban learning experience. The first report in the CUBE school climate series, Where We Learn, shared how students felt about their school environment through a survey of 32,000 urban students, the largest study conducted on urban school climate in public education.

With questions that mirror those of the student and teacher/administrator surveys, the third phase of this project solicited similar perspectives from parents and families about school climate. The report shares parent and family perceptions of seven major themes: parental involvement; expectations for success; safety; trust, respect, and ethos of caring; bullying; community welfare; and the importance of race.

Resources

  • The third second school climate survey, this report shares parental perceptions about seven major themes as they realte to the urban school climate.
  • Prepared to help school board members, superintendents, and school district communications directors talk with school staff, students, communities, and media about the survey report.
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Where We Teach Report

 

Where We Teach is the second school climate survey conducted by the National School Boards Association’s Council of Urban Boards of Education. Approximately 4,700 teachers and 267 building principals participated from 12 urban school districts in 10 states.  It comes on the heels of last year’s Where We Learn, a survey of 32,000 students that showed how students felt about their school environment.

With questions that mirror those of the student survey, Where We Teach is designed to solicit similar perspectives from the adults responsible for the learning environment about school climate.

The report shares teacher and administrator perceptions about eight major themes — safety, professional development, expectations, bullying, professional climate, parental involvement, influence of race, and trust, respect, and ethos of caring.

Resources

    • The second school climate survey, this report shares teacher and administrator perceptions about eight major themes.
  • Presented at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. by Dr. Brian K. Perkins
  • Prepared to help school board members, superintendents, and school district communications directors talk with school staff, students, communities, and media about the survey report.
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Where We Learn Report

 

NSBA's Council of Urban Boards of Education's (CUBE) new school climate report, Where We Learn, reveals that more than 70% of the urban students surveyed say they enjoy learning at their school, and the majority of those surveyed also feel safe at their school site, and have the respect of their teachers. CUBE surveyed more than 32,000 students in 15 member districts to learn how students perceived their school environment. In this study, students indicated their perceptions in five areas: school safety; bullying; trust, respect and ethos of caring; racial self-concept; and general concept.

The study was a project of the CUBE Urban Student Achievement Task Force whose focus is to study the achievement gap between urban students and their non-urban counterparts, exploring programs that are helping students achieve, and bringing attention to successful urban schools. Where We Learn can be a valuable tool for assessing school climate and considering the results as another indicator of student and school achievement. Please contact cube@nsba.org for any additional questions about this report.

Resources

    • The Urban School Climate Report .
  • Presented at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. by Dr. Brian K. Perkins
  • Prepared to help school board members, superintendents, and school district communications directors talk with school staff, students, communities, and media about the survey report. 
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